Disclaimer - By publishing this information on this Web site, the Boston, Massachusetts law firm of Altman & Altman LLP is not claiming to represent any clients or cases mentioned here. The content provided is designed to inform readers and is not intended as legal advice.

Father of 15-Year-old Killed in Marblehead Pedestrian Accident Accuses Essex District Attorney of Protecting Teen Driver

One month after 15-year-old Alessandra Castner was killed in a Marblehead, Massachusetts pedestrian accident while crossing the street, the investigation into the fatal traffic crash continues. However, the probe has become controversial following allegations by “Allie’s” father, Christopher Castner, that prosecutors are engaged in a coverup.

This week, Castner’s attorney sent Essex District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett a letter accusing authorities of improperly concealing the name of the driver, 18. The note also alleges a conflict of interest based on the claim that Blodget is friends with the motorist’s uncle. Criminal charges have not been filed over the deadly Essex County, Massachusetts pedestrian accident. The DA’s office is denying the accusations.

To date, there is no evidence that the driver was drunk, under the influence of drugs, speeding, texting, or talking on the cell phone. Castner, however, contends that his daughter was walking in a crosswalk when the vehicle struck her and there were no skid marks on the road. Following the deadly Massachusetts pedestrian accident, Alessandra was flown to Boston Medical Center where she was pronounced dead.

Massachusetts Pedestrian Accidents
Although police will investigate your pedestrian accident, it may be to your benefit to make sure that there is someone advocating on your behalf. An experienced Boston pedestrian accident law firm can conduct its own investigation into what happened.

Pedestrians struck by motor vehicles are seldom left unscathed, and in many instances, traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, internal injuries, and death can result.

Even if the driver didn’t intend to injure you or your loved one, the motorist can be held liable for engaging in distracted driving, speeding, failing to yield, text messaging, talking on the cell phone, drunk driving, failing to stop at a pedestrian crossing, and other negligent acts.

Family calls for driver to be charged in teen’s death, The Salem News, September 24, 2009
Victim’s dad claims coverup, Boston Herald, September 24, 2009
Related Web Resources:
Pedestrians, NHTSA
Pedestrian Fatality Facts, 2008, IIHS