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Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Sends Boston Mother and Kids to Massachusetts General Hospital

According to Boston fire officials, a Hyde Park mom and her three kids were treated at Massachusetts General Hospital today after they suffered from carbon monoxide poisoning. The four of them were removed from their residence this morning.

Fire Department spokesman Steve MacDonald said they were called to home the evening before after the CO detector went off. However, when firefighters arrived at the residence, they did not detect carbon monoxide in the air and they advised the family to change the detection device’s battery.

The home’s owner, Jean Louisia, said that police might not have been able to detect the CO because he had opened the windows. Later that evening, the device went off again and Louisia unplugged him.

It wasn’t until around 6:30am this morning while Louisia was driving to work that his 20-year-old daughter called to express concern that her mom and siblings weren’t feeling well. (Firefighters that arrived at the scene this morning recorded high carbon monoxide readings on the premise.)

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Because you cannot smell or see carbon monoxide, it can creep up on a victim without his/her knowing, causing serious injuries, including brain damage, and even death. Nonelectric boilers, fuel-fired furnaces, certain types of space heaters, ovens, gas stoves, other appliances that use gas, or a vehicle left running in the garage can cause carbon monoxide poisoning in the home. The wintertime, when a lot of these appliances are in use, is when many CO poisoning accidents happen. Appliance malfunction or the external vent to a fuel-burning appliance getting clogged up by snow are just two reasons why too much carbon monoxide might leak into the air.

Depending on the source of the carbon monoxide leak, there may be someone that should be held liable for the injuries sustained by you or your loved ones. An experienced Boston injury lawyer can help you explore your legal options.

Mother, three children from Hyde Park taken to hospital after carbon monoxide exposure, Boston.com, January 23, 2012
Carbon monoxide drives four from Hyde Park home, Boston Herald, January 23, 2012
Protect Your Family and Yourself from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning, EPA

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