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Injured Acrobats from Circus Accident Hire Attorneys; Speak Out

Several acrobats injured in a horrific circus accident in Providence, Rhode Island last month have hired attorneys and are speaking out about their terrifying experience.

Seven circus acrobats were seriously hurt during a performance for the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus, which held shows in downtown Providence at the Dunkin’ Donuts Center in May. The female acrobats were apart of a performance in which they were suspended from the ceiling of the show’s tent in an act called the “human chandelier.” The women were attached to the contraption by their hair.

During the performance a steel clamp holding the women to the ceiling snapped, sending the acrobats plummeting approximately 20 feet to the floor. A ninth performer who was standing below was also injured. Since the accident, several of the performers have struggled to regain mobility, and remain at Spaulding Rehabilitation Center in Boston trying to recover.

During an emotional press conference, several of the acrobats expressed how their injuries have changed their lives and how they are slowly trying to recover post-accident. Several of the victims have undergone dozens of surgeries and have endured hours of physical therapy. According to an article published by the Boston Globe, two patients suffered severe spinal cord injures, five sustained open fractures, and one suffered a lacerated liver. Some of the acrobats expressed not being able to return to the circus.

Since the accident, the acrobats have hired attorneys to fully investigate the incident and determine who is ultimately responsible for the incident. A preliminary investigation by a fire department investigator said that possible causes for the incident could include improper rigging, an overloaded carabiner, or a manufacturing defect.

Lawyers for the female acrobats include Michael S. Krzak and Thoman K. Prindable of the Clifford Law Offices in Chicago. During the press conference the attorneys stated that they are still trying to determine who the liable parties might be and whom they will ultimately file suit against. The performers cannot sue Ringling Brothers because of workers’ compensation laws. Products liability laws are going to be at the forefront of this case, as are premises liability, because ultimately it was the clamp holding the performers during the performance that snapped and caused the accident to occur. Attorneys will be focusing their attention on the maker of that clamp and any other faulty equipment responsible for the accident, as well as looking at how the Dunkin’ Donuts center may be responsible for the incident.

This horrific event is a sad reminder of the dangers posed to consumers from faulty products. Though it has not been confirmed whether the steel clamp broke because it was faulty or because of human error, we suspect that the maker of the steel clamp will be investigated for its part in the accident.

At the law offices of Altman & Altman, our team of seasoned attorneys has been handling all types of personal injury cases-from products liability claims to premises liability cases-and have a proven track record of successfully achieving high financial compensation for our clients. If you were injured recently, due to another party’s negligence, or because of a faulty product, do not hesitate to enlist the counsel of a legal professional to discuss your legal rights and options. Our attorneys pride themselves on delivering the highest quality legal counseling and are available around the clock to answer any and all inquiries for our clients. Call or email us today to set up a consultation with one of our esteemed legal team members. All initial consultations are completely confidential and free of charge.

Original article by The Boston Globe.