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Will New Mandatory Standard for Frame Child Carriers Decrease Injury Incidents?

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has approved new mandatory standard to enhance the safety of frame child carriers. The safety standard does not apply to soft carriers and slings, which are subject to different standards.

Between January 2003 and September 4, 2004, the CPSC has received close to 50 incident reports about this child product, including reports of 34 injuries. One incident involved a toddler who sustained a head injury after a frame child carrier fell from a chair.

According to the new standard, a frame child carrier is typically made of fabric placed around a frame that is designed to carry a child weighing anywhere between 16 to 50 pounds. The child typically is too young to sit up without support. The carriers are worn on the backs of caregivers, often when hiking.

Unfortunately, there have been hazards linked to frame child carriers, including small parts, lead paint, sharp points, pinching, shearing, scissoring, flammability issues, exposed coil springs, latching and locking, labeling, unintended folding, structural integrity, leg openings, dynamic stretch, stability, static loads, restraints, and handle integrity. The federal standard addresses all of these hazards. Frame child carriers made or imported on or after 18 months after the standard is published in the Federal Register will be subjected to the new regulation.

In Massachusetts, our Boston child injury lawyers represent the families of children that have gotten hurt because of defective or dangerous infant and kids’ products. Contact Altman & Altman LLP today.

We also handle Massachusetts products liability cases involving nursery products, playground apparatuses, child car seats, toys, furniture, and other consumer goods that proved hazardous or malfunctioned.

The New Standard
, CPSC.gov

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