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Jury Awards $227 Million to Victims of 2013 Wall Collapse

In 2013, an unsecured brick wall collapsed onto a Salvation Army store in 2013, killing seven people and injuring another 12. The tragic incident occurred when the wall, which was located at a demolition site, fell onto the Philadelphia, PA thrift store. Following a 17-week long trial, victims were awarded a total of $227 million, to be divided among the survivors and family members of the deceased. In total, 19 families were affected by this devastating accident.

The demolition site owner, the architect and contractor managing the demolition, and the Salvation Army were all found to be liable for the collapse, and thus the resulting injuries and deaths. The Salvation Army will pay $200 million of the settlement, and the demolition site owner is responsible for the remaining $27 million. A Boston injury lawyer can help you determine how to proceed if another’s negligence has caused you or a loved one harm.

How Will the Settlement be Divided?

In cases where large settlements are divided among multiple recipients, juries decide how much each plaintiff should receive. In some situations, however, parties may agree to divide the award outside of court. That is exactly how the Philadelphia case is being handled; the survivors and families will divide the proceeds in arbitration. This is different from a class action verdict in that every plaintiff must be in agreement with the way the award is to be distributed. In smaller cases, this agreement may be reached with a conversation and a handshake, but with nearly 20 parties involved in the Philadelphia case, an arbitrator is crucial to a fair, friendly, and efficient distribution process.

What is Arbitration?

Arbitration is one form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR), a process that provides an alternative to going to trial. In arbitration, each individual involved will be asked to sign an agreement that describes what was agreed upon. This effectively means that plaintiffs will not be permitted to appeal the decision, with very few exceptions. Once all parties have agreed to be bound by the agreement, anyone who wishes to receive a portion of the award must submit evidence of their damages to the arbitrator. Following this process, and based on the findings, the arbitrator will divide the damages as deemed appropriate. Although the trial above lasted several years, arbitration is rarely as long. In fact, this case will likely be concluded within a few months.

Disadvantages of Arbitration

In some cases, arbitration can dramatically reduce stress and legal costs. But it’s not always the best course of action. For starters, you have limited recourse following arbitration; if the arbitrator’s award isn’t fair, there is little to nothing you can do to air your grievances in court. Arbitration may also present an uneven playing field, created by the arbitration clauses of large companies, for example. And the process of choosing an arbitrator is rarely an objective one. If you are unsure whether arbitration is right for you, a MA injury lawyer can help you determine how to move forward.

Altman & Altman, LLP – Boston’s Premier Personal Injury Law Firm

If you have been harmed due to another’s negligence, the skilled legal team at Altman & Altman, LLP can help. We will analyze the details of your case to determine the most appropriate legal strategy and will position you for the best outcome. With more than 50 years’ experience, our knowledgable attorneys have an impressive track record of obtaining compensation for clients. If you’ve been injured, you may be entitled to compensation for medical expenses, pain and suffering, and lost wages. Don’t go through this difficult time alone. We can help. Contact Altman & Altman, LLP today for a free and confidential consultation about your case.